Jefferson, Texas Page3
 
Courtesy of James Neel, TX
 
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(2015) Enlarge Cumberland Presbyterian Church
 
Jefferson had churches of all denominations, including after the war a Jewish Synagogue and briefly a Catholic convent. Unfortunately, none of the antebellum houses of worship survive; the 1870's Cumberland Presbyterian Church seen here is likely the oldest.

(2015) Enlarge Cumberland Presbyterian Church

      
 

(2015) Enlarge Gen. J. H. Rogers House
 
According to the Texas State historical marker on it, a typical feature of most of Texas' old homes and historic structures, the Rogers house is the oldest in Jefferson. If it was in fact built in 1839, it predates the founding of the town, a distinct possibility. Gen. J. H. Rogers referred to on the marker was a local lawyer, judge, and delegate to the Texas Secession Convention in 1861, and judge of the Fifth Judicial District 1874 - 75. During the war he was appointed by Governor Edward Clark to arrange for the transfer of Texas State Troops into Confederate service and was a commissioner for ordinance and stores seized by Texas and Louisiana from the Federal government upon secession.

 

(2015) Enlarge Gen. J. H. Rogers House

     
 

(2015) Enlarge Gen. J. H. Rogers House

 

(2015) Enlarge Secession Hall
 
Built in 1856, this house takes its grandiose title from having been the home of Judge William Smith Todd, another member of the Texas Secession Convention and a signer of the Texas Ordinance of Secession. Judge Todd was an ardent secessionist, evidenced by the fact he named his newborn son William Secession Todd; perhaps fortunately for him, Judge Todd failed to survive the war, dying in 1864. In 1869 the house was purchased by Dr. Archibald Terhune who had been the surgeon of the 18th Georgia during the war. Dr. Terhune subsequently added a small room at the back of the house to act as his office.

     
 

(2015) Enlarge Secession Hall

 

(2015) Enlarge The Beard House
 
Built about 1860 by Marion County Sheriff Noble A. Birge, the house and its interior were said to have been inspired by the architecture of steamboats. During the war Captain Birge served as quartermaster of Crump's Cavalry Battalion 1861 - 62 before becoming Assistant Quartermaster for the Trans-Mississippi Department in Monroe and Shreveport, Louisiana, and after 1863, back in Jefferson where he oversaw supply to Confederate troops in the Northeast Texas area. After the war the house was purchased by Anna Beard, by whose name it is more commonly known locally.

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